We use cookies to give you the best possible experience on our site. Click here to find out more. Allow cookies
x
LOG IN HERE
Username
Password

arrow Register here

Forgotten password?

THE CHATTER BOX

 
  
  
  The Chatter Box : Blathering On
  
  
  
 
Messages 1 2 

What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by Helen on 7 July 2004 3:23pm
 
and why would someone rub linseed oil into it?
Is it the sea bird? the one the airs itself out on the rocks after each swim? And I would imagine that linseed oil would inhibit the drying process. Am I on the right track?
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by JK on 7 July 2004 5:11pm
 
The tradition of applying linseed oil to cricket bats is so passe. I think you`ll find this revolutionary new technique makes the sea-based bird more buoyant in the choppy North Sea swells, even more so than cider.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by gwen on 7 July 2004 5:42pm
 
Helen, Meaning of Life. Bird and oil are referred to by Headmaster John Cleese. However, JK's post is firmly founded in fact. Around these shores people got fed up long ago at the sheer volume of virtually free-floating rafts of cricket bats impeding our swimming activities, so looked for something else into which to rub our linseed oil, and eventually someone suggested the cormorant idea.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by Helen on 7 July 2004 5:52pm
 
I see. Both of you have been very helpful.
This is very clear now, and I thank you.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by gwen on 7 July 2004 6:00pm
 
Very glad to be of help. More information which may also be useful: probably in the colonies you won't even have heard of cricket bats, perhaps even think they are a sort of radar-emitting jumping night creature. In fact not, they are inanimate, made of wood, wide-ish from the bottom all the way until near the top when they get very very much thinner. Fairly much like a dinosaur.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by JK on 7 July 2004 6:34pm
 
Cricket - WG Grace, dinosaur-esque apparatus smothered in linseed oil, village greens, cucumber sandwiches, deep fine leg, silly mid off, deep square leg, the googly, the cover drive, headmasters, the aristocracy, broken digits…………..

This, Helen, is the essence of cricket. Regarding the humble cormorant, for your guidance;

Cor´mo`rant - Noun- Pronunciation: kôr´mô`rant: cormorant - large voracious dark-colored long-necked seabird with a distensible pouch for holding fish; used in Asia (and English public shcools) to catch fish and serve as an object of smother.

The lark.

The…………lark.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by Helen on 7 July 2004 9:06pm
 
Gawl, I didn't think I would get this much help. It all makes PERFECT SENSE now!
I think there is a cricket bat in my barn! It squeaks when I try to poke it with a stick...
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by Louise on 8 July 2004 3:11am
 
Helen, may I suggest you find a "Bill Oddie" for more expert info ... They are small, enthusiastic, and come with free binoculars. Available seasonally from BBC2.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by Izot on 8 July 2004 5:52am
 
>>>I think there is a cricket bat in my barn! It squeaks when I try to poke it with a stick...<<<

ROFLMAO!

Quote of the week.
 
Re: What exactly is the "School Cormorant'? by JK on 13 July 2004 11:07pm
 
For the sake of the stick, I sincerely hope that casualty is still open as it may be coming down with a small dose of rabies. Lot of it about dont you know.

In the meantime, try imPALINg (you can have that one for free) a few oranges and grapes on said indisposed stick. It`ll need the vitamin C.
 
Messages 1 2 




  Reply to this post:
 
 
  Username 
 
 
  Password 
 
 
 
 
  Register here
 

INSTRUCTIONS

Select a discussion theme.
Register (or log in if you have not yet done so).

To start a new discussion topic:

Write the name of the topic in the 'Subject' box.
Type your message in the larger box to contribute.
Click 'Submit'.

To join a discussion topic:

Click on the discussion topic of your choice.
Type your message in the larger box to contribute.
Click 'Submit'.

To edit your message:

You can edit a message at any time after posting it as long as you're signed in.
Click on the 'Edit your message' link above the message.
Make your desired changes.
Click 'Submit'.

If you find you don't want to change the message after all, click on 'Return without changes'.

To set a chatmark:

Register (or log in if you have not yet done so).
Click on the "Set chatmark" link on the Chatter Box pages. This will set the time at which you have logged in.
Click on the "Go to chatmark" link to see all messages posted since you set your chatmark.

You can set your chatmark at any time and as often as you like.