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  The Chatter Box : Travel
  
  
  
 
Messages 1 2 

Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 15 March 2005 8:17pm
 
Hi Anne. It looks like the long explaination of the New Orleans informatin I wrote to you has disappeared in the fracas. I sure hope you got all what I wrote to you about The French Quarter.

I'll continue with more ideas.
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 15 March 2005 8:41pm
 
A "must" is going to the French Market, a series of long open sheds where the market has existed since the early 1800's.. It's America's oldest city market. I think places like this are a great way to sample the culture a region. Here you'll find large vats of alligator, crawfish and pork boudin being stirred in large metal pots with big sticks. Also, fresh vegetables and fruit are sold, among many other regional specialites. If you get a chance to sample the local foods, you really must. This is a colorful scene.

Stop by St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square, the first Roman Catholic Cathedral in the USA. Right near the French Quarter you'll find artists displaying their work. It's a green quadrant where you can relax and enjoy, and where the "old and new" blend. You might want to get a shoeshine too!

Beignets are a fluffy powdered sugar-coated piece of dough and very popular at Cafe du Monde. It's tradition to eat them. Don't miss them for a nice little treat.

I would suggest buying lunch at the Central Grocery. A little shop with large sandwiches called muffulettas. They say calling them sandwiches is like calling Buckingham Palace a house. lol. But they are fat concoctions of meat, cheese, pickles and olive salad stuffed between two thick buns. I'm a fussy eater and wasn't sure I'd like them, but I loved them. In fact, we cut one into halves and there was enough for my boyfriend and myself. He's a big eater and was satisfied with that alone. You can also buy other food and beverage at the same store. We took ours outside and sat ona step or surb someplace. I don't recall tables insde the grocery store.

I certainly hope you like seafood or aren't afraid to try new dishes. There's an old saying in New Orleans.... :"Suck dem heads and pinch dem tails!" Yep, that's what they say and it's all in fun. It relates to crawfish. The very very best place for doing this is at the Acme Oyster House. Go in and place an order of one serving, unless you're starving and need two platesful. It's enough for a large snack for two people. It's finger food and that's whre the pinching comes in. lol You'll need napkins too.

As you travel around, you'll see lots of Mardi Gras stuff----masks, beads, t-shirts, etc. It's fun to bring home a little something about that even though you might not be there during the actual festival. At the Mississippi River waterfront, you'll see steamboats (paddlewheels). Cruises can be taken all along the river but you'll need lots of time for that. But they are great fun to see, especially when the wheels are turning and churning the water. We happened to be there to see "The Cajun Queen" and "The Natchez".
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 15 March 2005 8:56pm
 
I believe you mentioned your husband's liking of the American Civil War. Well, Confederate Gen. Beauregarde's house is in New Orleans and it has a little garden for you.

There's also a Confederate Museum near Lee Circle (929 Camp Street), run by the Louisiana Historical Association, and used to be open everyday except Sunday, with a small admission fee. All sorts of memorabilia and personal effects of Confederate leaders. It's the oldest museum in La. and is on the National Register of Historic Places. When you spot a huge painted mural outside, that's where the museum is. The circle has a tall column with Lee atop it so it's not too easy to miss.

I happendd to notice the original case and silver cutlery that belonged to Robert E. Lee. (By the way, he is my close ancester on my Mom's side., so that was nice. And the silver was made in my hometown or Baltimore, Maryland!)

If you happen to be near the cemetery and see the Ursuline Convent somewehre nearby, notice the etching in the concrete sidewalk at the entrance... "Arche veche'= French for "Archbishops Residence".

Although not a must to see, the well-known American football stadium called the Superdome, is located in N.O. too.

 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 15 March 2005 9:35pm
 
Oh dear. It happened again................. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr..............I wrote a long dissertation and the site timed out on me and was lost. I'll have another go at it later. Stay tuned, Anne.
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 2:47pm
 
Audubon Place is a private residential area , heabvliy guarded preventing entrance withlut proper authority. it's located near Tulane and Loyola Universities and also the Audubon Zoo. HUge , grand mansions are here, also located along St. Charles Avenue. This is the line where the original "Streetcar Named Desire " ran. WHile you are down that way, and if you need a break from the usual tourists spts, the zoo is quit a nice one.
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 3:05pm
 
The Garden District: Ask the streetcar driver where to get off to visit the GArden District. which borders St. Charles Avenue. Or you can park you car someplace near there. This area is best seen on foot so you can appreciate the details it offers. Mansions and wrought iron grillwork, WHite an Black lace and beautiful fenced gardens. Also the homes of prominent people. Autor Anne Rice, who wrote the Vampire Chronicles" lives there and she can been seen at times in her yard. This is the nieghborhood of which she writes in her novels.

For your husband, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, died at his fined's hiuse in the Garden District. There's a monument to that by the house.

You will also notice large blocks of stone by the streets on which people sttod to mount and dismount horses and to get into and out of carriages, prior to paved streets.

Take special note of the fences and grilwork. it often reprsents the occupation of the original owners and was commissioned specialy for them. See if you can spt some of that. Also, see if you can find the long fence of cornstalks.

See if you can find the gate with a sign that reads. "Attention du Chien", (or Beware of Dog).

Victorian ginergerbread woodwork is also part of the architecture you'll see.

This is an old neighborhood with large trees and lots of cooling shade. A wonderful relaxing stroll where it is peaceful and quiet.

If possible, getting a pamphlet with explainations is the best way to take the walking tour. Your B&B host/hostess or visitors center should have them.
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 3:05pm
 
The Garden District: Ask the streetcar driver where to get off to visit the GArden District. which borders St. Charles Avenue. Or you can park you car someplace near there. This area is best seen on foot so you can appreciate the details it offers. Mansions and wrought iron grillwork, WHite an Black lace and beautiful fenced gardens. Also the homes of prominent people. Autor Anne Rice, who wrote the Vampire Chronicles" lives there and she can been seen at times in her yard. This is the nieghborhood of which she writes in her novels.

For your husband, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, died at his fined's hiuse in the GArden District. There's a monument to that by the house.

You will also notice large blocks of stone by the streets on which people sttod to mount and dismount horses and to get into and out of carriages, prior to paved streets.

Take special note of the fences and grilwork. it often reprsents the occupation of the original owners and was commissioned specialy for them. See if you can spt some of that. Also, see if you can find the long fence of cornstalks.

See if you can find the gate with a sign that reads. "Attention du Chien", (or Beware of Dog).

Victorian ginergerbread woodwork is also part of the archetectural you'll see.

This is an old neighborhood with large trees and lots of cooling shade. A wonderful relaxing stroll where it is peaceful and quiet.

If possible, getting a pamphlet with explainations is the best way to take the walking tour. Your B&B host/hostess or visitors center should have them.
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 3:17pm
 
Swamp Tour:
Louisiana is well known for it;s many swamp areas. They offer a glimpse of wildlife, alligators, snakes, turtles and birds, not to mention an offering of excitement...All within a natural habitat and surrounded by moss covered cypress trees and other tropical vegetation. If you have a good part of a day, set it aside for this.

We went into the bayous with a 7th generation Cajun, born and raised in the area. There were about 15 people on the "craft" we used to bavigate the swamps and bayous. He pointed out the interesting things and fed the alligators chicken pieces and marshmallows on a mere 3-foot stick> Talk about exciting when the gators jumped up for the food and came up close and personal!!!!! Whew! But it's safe and frightening fun. lol We drove southwest across the bridge and took Chacahoula Tours, operated out of a trapper hut in the Bayou Segnette, in "Dupre" country. This was several years ago, so be sure they are still there . This trip was recommended by our B&B hosts.

While we were on the other side of the river, we drove around after the swamp trip and stopped near levies and shrimp boats and saw people fishing for their dinners.

 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 3:21pm
 
Great River Road Plantation Parade:
There are numerous plantation homes all along this road and many are open to the public for tours, lodging and eating. You and your husband both will really enjoy this drive. Homes here are mostly built in Greek Revival and old Creole styles.

Be absolutely certain to stop at Oak Alley and tour the interior. Also Houmas House. If you visit at least two, you will be in good shape and have sampled a wonderful era of anterbellum American life. Oak Alley Plantation boasts a 28 live-oak tree-lined alley, at least 100 yrs oder than the Big House and is considered the most spectacular setting in the Mississippi Valley. it has a gift shop and restaurant too.

The plantation personnel are dressed in period dress and there are stories of ghosts in some mansions. it's such a romantic era so I hope you have time for this drive.

Be sure to grab a pamphet about these homes and the drive at a visitors cnter. Must not miss this if you are in Louisiana. This region is about an hour from New Orleans, which by the way, is pronounced "Nawlins" by locals.

Have fun. I think I've told you everything. If you have any specific information you;d like to know, ask me. I'll be happy to answer.

Happy Travels, as Michael would say!!!!!!

Patty~
 
Re: Anne Harris-New Orleans by peripatetically on 16 March 2005 8:00pm
 
Oh WOW! Anne, Our tv channel HGTV, "Home and Garden Tv, is doing a segment on New Orleans as I write. They just finished the Garden District and are going to do Audubon Park next. Unbelievable, isn't it? By the way, the park is good for joggers, rollerbladers and walkers, etc., if I didn't mention it before.
 
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