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THE CHATTER BOX

 
  
  
  The Chatter Box : Travel
  
  
  
 
Messages 1 2 3 4 5 6 

Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by Simon W on 17 April 2003 2:15pm
 
It has to be the tiny Greek Island of Lipsi, has anyone else been there?
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by Simon W on 17 April 2003 2:16pm
 
It has to be the tiny Greek Island of Lipsi, has anyone else been there?
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by mazcam on 18 April 2003 4:36pm
 
There is two places we found to be friendliest. 1st is Eceabat in Turkey, lived there for 3 weeks in a hostel and the locals never wanted us to leave.

The other place is Cetinje, Montenegro. We had trouble trying to communicate to the local resturanter in our best sign language and so, thankfully a group of school girl, who were learning English at school, helped us get some food. After that they offered to show us around their town and to the local monastery with a full decription translated into English from a inhabitant of the monastery.
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by peripatetically on 18 April 2003 5:22pm
 
Mazcam, I've also been to Centinje. I went to much of Yugoslavia in the mid 80's, before the republics broke apart. I found the people there very friendly and warm. The majority of the people, particularly along the coast, were just great. I discovered that the educated citizens there speak many languages very well, learn them quite easily, and English with little or no accent. I loved my two full weeks in that country and brought home many wonderful pictures and memories.

Patty~

PS. I was even proposed to in Dubrovnik!!
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by susithwaites on 25 April 2003 11:53pm
 
Hi, I think the friendliest place I've ever been was Thailand. The Thai people are truly beautiful (even when trying to rip you off at sidewalk stalls they do it with a smile!) - they have gentle souls that smile.
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by viv on 27 April 2003 9:45pm
 
Layla, as a proud Corkonian I am very happy that you were made feel welcome here. Yes we are very relaxed and love meeting different people so next time bring your friends and family!
*lol*
viv
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by MissTrixiB on 27 April 2003 10:29pm
 
There is a Fish & Chips place in near Bayswater station in London where I think the freindliest man in London served us (sans Mr. Palin, ofcourse). OH.....you mean city or region! ;-) Truth be told-Chicago Illinois! There is a kind of mix of Mid-Western nice with an irreverant sense of humour. Everywhere I went, people would talk and joke with me in that sort of sarcastic way. You can walk down the street with a map, and strangers will pop out of nowhere to help you find your way. One site affected me the most (this is rather silly), but I saw a cab driver get out of his cab at a busy intersection to try and help a wounded bird get out of the way. We're lucky if cabbies stop for pedestrians in some cities ;-)
Kisses-
trixi
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by ilse on 28 April 2003 3:10pm
 
in some cities, (i live close to nyc), you're lucky if they can drive and speak english.: ) speaking of cabs, i have a question for anyone who lives in london. i saw a documentary a long time ago (i think it was about brain structure and function or something) and they said that london taxi drivers have to memorize every location in the city. is this true? has anyone tested them?lol

by the way, sorry this really doesn't have anything to do with the subject, but it's been bugging me for a while!almost all the times i've traveled, i've been visiting family, and they're usually all very friendly to me: )
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by BB-Scala on 28 April 2003 8:19pm
 
Dublin, Ireland! -- I was hired by a band that had relocated from Woodstock, NY to Dublin in 1988 and I spent a year there. Everyone is so nice and TEA is served at every turn! I nearly starved to death because I am a vegetarian and band life sets your dinner hour at 3 AM quite often, but tea and biscuits can get one through just about anything! The rest of the band seemed to survive on Guinness which would have, I have been told, saved me all the colds and flu's I suffered due to the horrific weather (don't throw me those double rainbows and think that you can change my opinion of Irish weather)! You don't know COLD until you've stood out on O'Connell Bridge with your amplifier in tow, trying to hail a cab at 1 AM on St. Stephen's Night. Actually, when my saxophone player, Bob, showed up at my flat drenched, and smelling like fish at 3 AM one evening, I realized that COLD is really defined by how far a man can walk in high-heels without saying, "brrr" after a night of drinking, wearing women's clothing and falling into The Grand Canal with saxophone in hand. I served him tea and gave him a blanket (one I didn't need returned) and listened to this terrible tale of trauma with tears of laughter streaming down my face all the while!! My doctor had driven me home from my gig (Dr. Joyce was a friend of the band - he was laughing as hard as I) so he was there to attend to Bob's runny nose, and running hair, and running everything! Bob is now "Beverly" but that is another story. <sigh> Everyone is friendly in Dublin -- the Tea-bringers, the doctors and those who fish you out of the drink when you forget where you've parked your car.

[email protected] - NYC, USA
 
Re: Where's the friendliest place you've visited? by BB-Scala on 28 April 2003 8:29pm
 
Dublin, Ireland! -- I was hired by a band that had relocated from Woodstock, NY to Dublin in 1988 and I spent a year there. Everyone is so nice and TEA is served at every turn! I nearly starved to death because I am a vegetarian and band life sets your dinner hour at 3 AM quite often, but tea and biscuits can get one through just about anything! The rest of the band seemed to survive on Guinness which would have, I have been told, saved me all the colds and flu's I suffered due to the horrific weather (don't throw me those double rainbows and think that you can change my opinion of Irish weather)! You don't know COLD until you've stood out on O'Connell Bridge with your amplifier in tow, trying to hail a cab at 1 AM on St. Stephen's Night. Actually, when my saxophone player, Bob, showed up at my flat drenched, and smelling like fish at 3 AM one evening, I realized that COLD is really defined by how far a man can walk in high-heels without saying, "brrr" after a night of drinking, wearing women's clothing and falling into The Grand Canal with saxophone in hand. I served him tea and gave him a blanket (one I didn't need returned) and listened to this terrible tale of trauma with tears of laughter streaming down my face all the while!! My doctor had driven me home from my gig (Dr. Joyce was a friend of the band - he was laughing as hard as I) so he was there to attend to Bob's runny nose, and running hair, and running everything! Bob is now "Beverly" but that is another story. <sigh> Everyone is friendly in Dublin -- the Tea-bringers, the doctors and those who fish you out of the drink when you forget where you've parked your car.

[email protected] - NYC, USA
 
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