We use cookies to give you the best possible experience on our site. Click here to find out more. Allow cookies
x
LOG IN HERE
Username
Password

arrow Register here

Forgotten password?

THE CHATTER BOX

 
  
  
  The Chatter Box : Blathering On
  
  
  
 
Messages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

Re: "English" questions by Spursfan on 18 November 2008 8:07am
 
I can remember our English teacher (who was an American from Rhode Island) bringing in an American English - UK English dictionary one day! It was a huge thing and she sent it round the form so we could all have a look.

As (early) teenage girls we used to think it terribly amusing when she was reading out something for us to copy down, as instead of 'full stop' she would say 'period' (pause for a teenage snigger)!!

I remember her fondly, as she changed her plans to return to the US long enough to take us right through to 'O'-level (5 years). That was dedication in my eyes.

 
Re: "English" questions by mrsthing on 18 November 2008 1:02pm
 
I was taught in school to use the article "an" before a word starting with H, e.g., "an historic occasion". I still do it out of force of habit, but nobody else I know does (except my husband, who's mother is a Brit).

My second grade teacher spent her summers and winter breaks in England, and come to think of it, might have come over to the US from England during the war--she had a slight British accent. Anyway, one January she came back and gave me an old English copper penny. It was bigger than an American half dollar, and heavy as lead. I couldn't imagine anyone walking around with a bunch of them in a pants pocket or pocketbook. I don't know where it is now. Even though it was brown and a bit worn, it would probably be worth more than a penny now.
 
Re: "English" questions by peripatetically on 18 November 2008 1:23pm
 
I use "an" in front of some "h" words. Honor, honest and hour are the ones that come to mind right now.
Then there's the word "herb". Do you or do you not pronounce the "H"?
 
Re: "English" questions by ev on 18 November 2008 1:37pm
 
'Hard' H's aren't normally preceded by 'an'. (e.g. hospital, horse, hose)

'Soft'/'silent' H's are. (e.g. hour, honorary)
 
Re: "English" questions by peripatetically on 18 November 2008 1:53pm
 
Yes, Ev, that's what my example says too.

But do you pronounce the "H" in herb? I never did as a child, but I occasionally hear it pronounced by some gardeners now.( Might be the it English verses the USA ?)
 
Re: "English" questions by ev on 18 November 2008 2:33pm
 
Of course in some English dialects you don't pronounce the h in herb.

In the cockney dialect h is almost never pronounced at all. But you probably know that already :)
 
Re: "English" questions by bIG bLOGGER on 18 November 2008 3:37pm
 
Too Right,ev!

In 'Elsinki,'urricanes 'ardly ever 'appen!

(...What a vulgar way to talk!!)
 
Re: "English" questions by ev on 18 November 2008 3:43pm
 
'ey! Mind what you say! In Australia we're proud of our cockney 'eritage!
 
Re: "English" questions by mrsthing on 18 November 2008 6:03pm
 
I have heard British people using "an" before a hard H. Is that regional?
 
Re: "English" questions by bIG bLOGGER on 3 December 2008 4:15pm
 
Some usage sounds OK either way you say it; for example,some would say:--
'a historic time'.. others:--
'an historic time' --:either sounds good. Likewise:--
'a hotel' or:
'an hotel'

a hysterical child' or:
'an hysterical child'..and so on..it's often at the discretion of the speaker,I don't think regional connotations come into it.

Q:Does anybody know how the word 'anorak' came to be used to refer to people who have a meticulous interest in facts and figures?

..The word 'anorak' literally means 'Eskimo jacket with a hood' and is an Inuit word.
 
Messages 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 




  Reply to this post:
 
 
  Username 
 
 
  Password 
 
 
 
 
  Register here
 

INSTRUCTIONS

Select a discussion theme.
Register (or log in if you have not yet done so).

To start a new discussion topic:

Write the name of the topic in the 'Subject' box.
Type your message in the larger box to contribute.
Click 'Submit'.

To join a discussion topic:

Click on the discussion topic of your choice.
Type your message in the larger box to contribute.
Click 'Submit'.

To edit your message:

You can edit a message at any time after posting it as long as you're signed in.
Click on the 'Edit your message' link above the message.
Make your desired changes.
Click 'Submit'.

If you find you don't want to change the message after all, click on 'Return without changes'.

To set a chatmark:

Register (or log in if you have not yet done so).
Click on the "Set chatmark" link on the Chatter Box pages. This will set the time at which you have logged in.
Click on the "Go to chatmark" link to see all messages posted since you set your chatmark.

You can set your chatmark at any time and as often as you like.